Architecture of Mykonos

Architecture of Mykonos

The traditional architecture of Mykonos is influenced by the climate and also by the cultural history of the island and the whole Cyclades complex. Simple materials and lines are used in such a way that every single building on the island stands in perfect harmony with the beauty of the natural landscape.

All houses in Mykonos bear the dominant characteristics of Cycladic architecture: cubic shapes, flat roofs and whitewashed walls. Of course, everything has a reason! The cubic shape provides protection from the winds, while the reflective white color of the walls and the flat roof minimizes the absorption of heat during the hot months and keeps the interior of the house cool. Furthermore, the walls are made pretty thick—60cm to 80cm—thus providing good protection against summer heat.

Architecture of Mykonos

Two of the most iconic landmarks in Mykonos, the famous Windmills and picturesque Little Venice are two very interesting examples of the local architecture of Mykonos.

Painted snow-white to blend in with the rest of the buildings, the Windmills (or Kato Myloi) were built in the 16th century and were used to mill mostly wheat and barley. Although they’ve ceased production, they still remain the most iconic feature of Mykonos and an impressive symbol of its rich past.

Architecture of Mykonos

Little Venice is a cluster of houses, bars and restaurants that are literally washed by the Aegean Sea. This district used to be the neighborhood of wealthy sailors and
merchants. The wooden balconies and the windows are painted in vivid red and blue, creating an eye-catching scenery that makes Little Venice a marvelous photo spot. It is more than obvious that the architecture of this charming quarter has been inspired by the Venetians.

Churches and chapels, another characteristic example of the architecture of Mykonos, can be found everywhere on the island; in the Town, in the fields, on the hillsides. If we had to use two words to describe them, they would have to be “simplicity” and “tranquility”. The Mykonian churches are painted in white, with their domes being red or blue. The thick masonry ensures that the interior of the churches is cool and shady.

Architecture of Mykonos

Mykonos Town (or Chora), the capital of the island, offers an architectural style that is unique, as the narrow marble streets create a gorgeous maze! Walking through the alleys of Mykonos Town is a fascinating experience. Colored doors and windows, whitewashed corners in sharp contrast with the brilliant blue sky, bougainvillea-adorned balconies are only a few of the many subjects visitors love to capture when strolling through the winding streets of Mykonos Town…